Male Breast Reduction

Male Breast Reduction (Gynecomastia)
Gynecomastia, known as “man boobs”, is a common condition in men and boys. Although it is not a serious problem, enlarged breasts in a man or teen can be cause for serious psychosocial concern and some physical discomfort.

Gynecomastia is more common in newborn males, boys during puberty, and older men. The male breasts swell and become abnormally large. The condition can develop as a result of normal changes in hormone levels, though other causes also exist.

Gynecomastia can affect one or both breasts, sometimes unevenly. Most patients who develop gynecomastia during puberty may find that it resolved on its own in time.

Preparation
In consultation with the patient Dr. Sabry will discuss symptoms, medical and drug history, and possibly family history. He will examine the breast tissue, as well as the genitals and abdomen.

If Dr. Sabry determines that the cause is a pubertal hormonal imbalance, typical for a teenage boy, the patient will be told that it will most likely go away within about a year and Dr. Sabry will continue to monitor him until the condition resolves.

If the breast lump is abnormally large, tender, one-sided, or fixed and hard, Dr. Sabry will order further tests, including a biopsy. If the patient has an unusual lump in one breast only, the Dr. Sabry will need to know whether there is a family history of breast cancer.

After a thorough evaluation, Dr. Sabry will discuss the best options available and tailor the approach that is just right for you based on your unique physical attributes and expectations. He is meticulous in achieving a natural, symmetrical outcome.

If you are a smoker, you will be asked to quit smoking 6-8 weeks before your surgery. Once you decide to move forward you will meet with our Practice Manager to go over scheduling, payment options and insurance questions. As you approach the date of your surgery you will have a comprehensive preoperative visit in our office approximately two weeks before your surgery. A complete list of “dos and don’ts” will be reviewed as well as the pre and postoperative instructions and any questions that remain will be answered. You will be directed to avoid anything that has a blood-thinning effect (aspirin, ibuprofen, vitamin E etc.) for two weeks before surgery. You will be asked to minimize alcohol intake. Basic blood work for preoperative testing will be ordered.

Procedure
The most effective way to correct this condition is surgical. Liposuction alone may be sufficient, or it may be performed in combination with surgical excision of glandular tissue and skin. Excision will leave a scar, usually around the edge of the nipple. Surgery is performed in an outpatient setting and typically takes 2 to 3 hours. It is performed either with general anesthesia or local anesthesia with sedation.

Recovery
If glandular excision is performed, a drain may be placed and maintained overnight.
A compression garment is applied at the end of the surgery and patients are advised to wear it day and night for minimum of two weeks. After that it will be worn only at night for next few weeks. Temporary swelling, bruising, numbness, soreness and burning sensations are to be expected. Patients may return to work within a week and may resume strenuous activities after 3 weeks. During your recovery process Dr. Sabry will see you for post-operative visits. He and our staff will answer any questions you may have about your recovery, as well as your overall health and well-being.

Complications
Complications from surgery are rare, and may include; not enough removal of breast tissue, the chest having an uneven contour, or reduced sensation of the nipple(s). Surgery involving excision, rather than liposuction, carries the risk of a blood clot forming, which may need to be drained.